89% of U.S. Parents Believe Violent Video Games Are a Problem

Most of them say they closely watch what games their children play

By on January 11th, 2013 14:05 GMT

A brand new survey has just been published in the U.S. that offers some interesting data concerning parents of the nation and how they think about violence not just in video games but also in the general media.

Common Sense Media and the Center for American Progress have posted a new survey in which 1,050 parents from across the U.S. have answered questions regarding violence in the media, including in video games.

The results are pretty intriguing, as over 89% of parents believe that violence in video games is a problem and 75 percent believe that shielding children from such violence is quite difficult.

While the survey also mentions that a majority of parents believe other factors contribute to violent behavior in children, like bullying or day-to-day life, video games are still blamed by them.

Check out some of the general results below, via the official survey.

Results:
* 89% of parents nationwide say violence in today's video games is a problem.
* 75% of parents say shielding children from violence is difficult.
* 93% of parents nationwide say lack of supervision for children contributes to violence.
* 92% of parents nationwide say bullying contributes to violence.
* 86% of parents nationwide say crime in day-to-day life contributes.
* 77% of parents nationwide say violence in TV and movies contributes.
* 75% of parents nationwide say easy access to guns contributes.
* 75% of parents nationwide say violence in video games contributes.
* 64% say violent toys contribute.

Some questions emphasized the responsibility of parents and 60% revealed that they very closely supervise what sort of content their children consume. 68 percent also mentioned that the current ratings systems for video games and movies help them make informed decisions.

While many surveys have pointed out that there's no clear connection between violence in video games and violence in real life, the debate has once again surfaced after the tragic events from the Sandy Hook school in Connecticut.

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