39% of US Adults Will Replace TVs with Tablets and New Media

Ideas that were absurd a couple of years ago are now appealing

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2012 brought with it a paradigm shift to how consumers and businessmen alike view their personal computers, entertainment consumer electronics and mobile gadgets. A certain report shows this clearly.

2012 brought with it a paradigm shift to how consumers and businessmen alike view their personal computers, entertainment consumer electronics and mobile gadgets. A certain report shows this clearly.

TV broadcast services and the Internet will stay a part of the modern man's life for decades to come, maybe even longer.

The method through which this content is delivered might be in for a big change though.

Right now, PCs are used for web access, while TVs, whether HD or Full HD, and with or without 3D support, deal with the television content delivery.

Smart TVs have made a great headway over the past couple of years, but they still qualify as TVs in the end.

This year (2013), there should be a sharp migration away from TVs, and the way they get TV content, and towards newer alternatives, like tablets and streaming media subscriptions.

In fact, 39% of all US adults, with ages of 18 to 32, will replace, or at least consider replacing, their TV cable and satellite providers with a streaming media subscription.

Belkin has made this forecast, and it has also said that 31% of people aged 35-54, and 20% of those over the age of 55, will do the same.

Either way, Netflix and Hulu Plus will get a lot more business over the next 12 months, and even more from 2014 onwards.

Consumers with children under 18 are more likely to take the plunge than those who live alone or don't have offspring.

That said, Belkin has also predicted that 38% of US adults between 18-34 will replace their notebook with a tablet, as will 34% of those aged 35-54 and 21% of the rest.

The slowdown on the PC market definitely supports the likelihood of all these projections. If even third greatest PC provider Dell wants to go private and focus on providing “services” instead of relying primarily on PCs, there is good cause to think things really could do with a change.

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