19nm-Based Memoright SSDs Released, Made of TLC Chips

They are called the XTM series and come in 2.5-inch / 7mm ultra-thin form factor

  Memoright XTM SSD
The next week is bound to welcome a whole bunch of SSDs for laptops, and all other sorts of hardware usable in them, and desktops for that matter, but the other segments of the IT industry aren't being forgotten.

The next week is bound to welcome a whole bunch of SSDs for laptops, and all other sorts of hardware usable in them, and desktops for that matter, but the other segments of the IT industry aren't being forgotten.

Memoright has just revealed a series of solid-state drives best suited for business servers, workstations, and applications in cloud computing.

Sure, they will work just fine in high-end personal computers too, but that's beside the point.

The solid-state drives are called XTM Series and are made of MLC (multi-level cell) or TLC (triple-level cell) NAND Flash memory chips.

Said chips are built on the 19 nm manufacturing process technology.

Spec-wise, the XTM Series SSDs are 2.5-inch units with a thickness of 7mm. That makes them especially thin, although not as thin as they could be. There are 5mm storage drives too after all, on the market.

Then again, there are, or will be, 1.8-inch models as well.

Moving on, three capacities will be provided: 128 GB, 256 GB and 512 GB.

The low-capacity model might not work as well as the others, but the top-tier models should be able to reach 540 MB/s when reading and 450 MB/s when writing, on a good day.

ECC debugging is included (up to 128 bits allocated), and the random IOPS performance is of 80,000.

Furthermore, the Mamoright SSDs support TRIM (frees up deleted sectors, preserving performance over time).

Finally, the newcomers are housed in thin cases colored black and teal. They're not the most glamorous but, then again, they don't need to be. It's not like anyone besides technicians will ever actually see them, especially if they end up in servers or notebooks.

Sales should begin soon. Probably after Computex Taipei has come and gone (June 4-8, 2013). Prices, sadly, haven't been disclosed yet.

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