13,200 Girl Scout Cookie Boxes Destroyed in California

The cookies were taken to a waste warehouse in Riverside, smashed into pieces

  Thousands of Girl Scout cookie boxes were destroyed in California back in 2012
Those concerned about environmental issues will not take kindly to the news that a whopping 13,200 girl scout cookies boxes have recently been destroyed in California.

Those concerned about environmental issues will not take kindly to the news that a whopping 13,200 girl scout cookies boxes have recently been destroyed in California.

Needless to say, this is because destroying these cookies can and should be labeled as nothing more and nothing less than wasting perfectly good food.

By the looks of it, these cookies were still very much edible, meaning that they were well within their expiration date and, as some maintain, quite tasty.

Therefore, rather than smashing them into bits and pieces and then disposing of them at a landfill, it would have been much better to donate them.

The Inquisitr
reports that, prior to their being taken to the landfill, the 13,200 boxes of cookies were taken to a waste warehouse in Riverside, where sanitation workers made sure that none of the boxes would remain intact.

According to the same source, these boxes of cookies were the ones that remained unsold following last year's Girl Scout's annual sale.

Interestingly enough, it seems that the practice of destroying perfectly good cookies did not make its debut in 2012.

Quite the contrary, unknown to many, it has been years since whatever cookies do not make their way into the cupboards of buyers nationwide are disposed of in this manner.

For the time being, Chuck MacKinnon, currently working with the San Gorgonio Council of the Girl Scouts in Redlands maintains that the company supplying the cookies, i.e. ABC Bakers, is the one to blame for the cookies' being destroyed.

As he explains, ABC Bakers only allows for 1% of the total unsold boxes to be returned for a refund, leaving the Girls Scouts organization with no other option except figure out a way to deal with the surplus themselves.

However, Chuck MacKinnon argues that he only became aware of how said 13,200 cookies boxes were disposed of when the media took a sudden interest in the issue and contacted him to demand some answers.

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